I first worked at Mondadori on an internship in 2009

Barbara Bottarelli - marketing manager food & kids

I first worked at Mondadori on an internship in 2009 in the magazine marketing area, specifically for the fitness and health sector. This gave me a behind the scenes look at the beauty and fascination of this world.

After completing the internship I worked initially in the mobile division – developing browser apps for all of the Mondadori titles and this was a big help for my next job when Mondadori offered me a fantastic opportunity to become the product manager for the Donna Moderna web site, which has since become Italy’s leading women’s portal.

My next challenge was to oversee the print-digital integration process for Starbene.

In 2015 I started managing the marketing for the entire Mondadori food hub. In addition to taking care of the content and product, I was also able to develop another important area, events. I also opened the Sale&Pepe cooking school.

In addition to these brands, I have also added the kids hub. And another interesting opportunity emerged when we started to develop new lines of business, events around the country and projects for schools.

If I think back to how I started as an intern, well, I have to say, I’ve made some progress!

Ours is a complex world but with an intrinsic beauty; a trunk full of surprises, where skill, experience and, above all, creativity are essential. Believe me, it’s an adventure that can often seem crazy.

Aaron Buttarelli - Editorial Director Mondadori Education

I started as a young student engaged in historical research who wanted to become a university professor, then I started a series of freelance collaborations with very small educational publishers in Bergamo. I worked for fourteen years in Turin, then, finally in 2010, I moved to Milan and started a great new adventure.

Publishing for schools operates along three principal coordinates.

The first is that educational publishing is project publishing. What this means is that the publisher has to look for an author to create and plan an editorial product suitable for the school market, the syllabus, and the teaching of the subject.

Project publishing, unlike the publishing of authors, in which there is essentially a single author who has produced a novel and who looks for a publisher to act as an intermediary and put his work on the market.

The second very important point about the specificity of school textbooks is that the product, with regard to the school cycle, is almost always a multi-year product, so there are different volumes; an now usually there is both a physical and a digital part.

Finally, there is a third element that characterises the educational publishing sector, and this has to do with the end user. The editorial project must be designed and created with the student in mind. But the characteristic of this sector that between the publisher and the student there is a decisive player: i.e. the teacher. For it is the teachers who decide which text to adopt, which book is most in line with their didactic approach, needs, habits and the context in which they work.

As you can see, it is a complex world but with an intrinsic beauty; a trunk full of surprises, where skill, experience and, above all, creativity are essential.

Believe me, it’s an adventure that can often seem crazy.

We get to try lots of things, and the results can be seen

Viola Zucchero - Social media manager digital magazines area

I started working in the digital area of the Mondadori Group during an experimental, almost pioneering, period. Initially I was involved in the forums and social media activities of Donna Moderna and then, later on, I began also working on the social media activities of the Group’s other brands.

Working in social media means working in a constantly evolving context, made up of words, but also of numbers.

The acquisition by the Mondadori Group of Banzai Media, in 2016, led to the creation of a new digital area with an inevitable mix of people from Mondadori and new colleagues from Banzai. It was clearly a great leap forward, in that coming into such close contact with a former competitor, with people who were once our rivals, was like bringing two halves together: those who were traditional stronger on the content side and those who were “natively” digital. The result has been a really strong team able to create new synergies. Of course it’s a greater risk, but we get to try lots of things, and the results can be seen.

It’s great to have so many challenges, while at the same time seeing so many dreams being realised through the efforts of people who believe in them.

Choosing a book to publish means understanding whether the text has a soul, something that pulsates inside of it, something that makes is particular, special.

Alberto Gelsumini - Managing editor of Mondadori miscellaneous non-fiction

What I’ve learned in fifteen years of working here at Mondadori, first as editor and now as editorial director, is that books have a body and a soul.

A book has a body because it is a thing; regardless of whether it is on paper or digital. It’s something tangible, the creation of which has a cost and which is sold at a price. It has production and distribution needs. It has, as it were, friction.

But I’ve also learned that a book has a soul and it is crucial for those of us who are in this business to know how to grasp and handles this aspect.

Choosing a book to publish means understanding whether the text has a soul, something that pulsates inside of it, something that makes is particular, special.

Curating a book means understanding exactly what its soul is, to focus on it, if not you risk confusing it with others and betraying it.

Launching a book means trying to communicate that soul to the outside world: with a title, a cover, a marketing or communication plan.

During these years at Mondadori I have learned how important it is to keep the body and soul of books together, almost mixing them up to the point where you’re not quite sure they are really two separate things.

One of the most fascinating aspects of the editorial process is that you never fully understand it.

But then, that’s also what happens with the most interesting people and the most beautiful poems.